Public Sphere #3: Australian ICT & Creative Industries Development

Friday, July 24th, 2009 @ 4:58PM

Update: See all videos below and linked in the schedule below.

Update: The briefing paper for this Public Sphere topic is available for public editing from the 10th September till the 7th October 2009.

Update: The draft schedule  is below and all information for the day (including a link for the video, but also the aggregated Twitter and such) is on the Live Wall. Also the Silicon Beach group have released a policy ideas discussion paper for this Public Sphere.

The Australian ICT industry is extremely broad in scope and expertise – from core infrastructure to mobile, Web 2.0 and of course the creative industries such as gaming, film and digital arts. Australia has done quite well on the international scene, however we could still do more to inspire many smart Australian professionals and companies to base themselves in Australia in the long term and to encourage international investment in the Australian ICT sector.

Having a strong Australian-based sector means a positive contribution to a number of important national goals: economic growth and exports, provide opportunities for skills development and experience in Australia’s workforce and finally, reinforcing Australia’s international reputation for excellence.

The ICT and creative industries have been shown around the world to be a massive contributor to national and global economic and productivity growth. It is extremely important – particularly given the current global climate – that we prioritise  support for ICT industry growth and development in Australia.

The global financial crisis has sharpened the focus on the efficiencies and innovation that ICT offers. When combined with the investment in the National Broadband Network, Australia is uniquely placed in the world to further grow a globally competitive industry and benefit the entire economy through improved infrastructure and innovative solutions.

This Public Sphere will engage with the ICT and creative industries, as well as the broader community to identify areas where government policy can be developed or enhanced to better facilitate the growth and development of these industries in Australia. The feedback we have had from the Silicon Beach group (which consists of many leading Australian ICT industry entrepreneurs) and others is that it is a good time to have this discussion.

How to participate in a Public Sphere topic

  • Post comments, links to papers, case studies and ideas to the blog post comments – comments will be summarised and presented at the event as part of the proceedings.
  • Blog with the tag publicsphere or Public Sphere and Twitter with #publicsphere so we can find your ideas, then post them below.
  • You can also contribute to the topic through our web form or sending us a letter, but please note all topic correspondence will be published here on the topic blog.
  • Run your own events and post your outcomes here in the comments.
  • Join us for our short workshop event, which will be streamed online so you can participate remotely.
  • Volunteer to give a (maximum) 10 minute talk (including questions) at the Public Sphere Camp event by adding your name, topic and which industry segment to the comments at the bottom of this post. We have only about 10-15 talk slots, so we won’t be able to accept all talks, however everyone can contribute through the many other mechanisms available.

Please note – links to the Twitter feed, video feed, liveblogging and live policy documents for the day will be made available on this page on the day.

All content and ideas are then presented in a one day event – the Public Sphere Camp – and anyone is welcome to propose a 10 minute (including questions) talk in the comments of this blog. There will also be a few talks accepted on the day, and discussion encouraged between participants both local and remote.

Anyone is welcome to attend the Public Sphere Camp, however seats are limited in the physical component of the event. Anyone will be able to see streaming video online and participate in the event discussion via Twitter, and we will ensure there is liveblogging on the day to also help capture the ideas presented on the day, and to capture external feedback on those ideas.

This Public Sphere event for this topic is being done in consultation with the community, in particular the Silicon Beach group.

Outcomes

All outcomes from this Public Sphere – including the event – will be collated into a briefing paper including the specific policy ideas put forward through the blog or on the day, all comments, Tweets, talks and live-blogging. The draft briefing paper will be put on the wiki and published to this Public Sphere topic where it will be publicly modifiable for 2 weeks after the event, after which we will finalise the post the final briefing paper to this topic.

The briefing paper will immediately go through to the Commonwealth Commercialisation Institute, an initiative by Minister Kim Carr. The briefing paper will also go to the Information Technology Innovation Council, also an initiative by Minsiter Kim Carr focused on ICT industry development. We will also circulate the briefing paper to other appropriate channels in Government.

Minister Carr’s office will be participating in this Public Sphere event.

Interested parties are welcome to contribute to help make the briefing paper as useful and concise as possible to the appropriate channels in Government.

Public Sphere Camp

We have decided to change the format of the Public Sphere Camp to encompass more discussion and realtime collaboration on policy development. We will put the schedule online within the coming week.

The day will have specific time and discussion allocated to the following industry segments:

  • Web 2.0 and mobile
  • Creative industries
  • Infrastructure and architecture

Each segment will tackle a combination of new trends and opportunities, funding models, startup support and a variety of other specific areas of relevance to government policy development.

The Public Sphere Camp will be in Wollongong, and we are planning to simultaneously have events in Brisbane and Melbourne to broaden the input.  This is to see whether multiple physical locations improve a Public Sphere Camp, and encourage meetings and discussions therein.

Why will this Public Sphere be in Wollongong and not a capital city? Because we want to recognise that our regional areas are an important part of this knowledge and creative economy too. The University of Wollongong has created an Innovation Campus to foster industry development in the area and local ICT businesses are being supported by a new local ICT industry cluster, called ICT Illawarra (ICTI).

We would like to acknowledge the support of ICTI as representatives of the ICT industry in Wollongong and the sponsorship of the University of Wollongong who have made the facilities of the Innovation Campus available to us for this Public Sphere event.

We would also like to acknowledge the support of NICTA, who are providing venues and teleconferecing facilities in both the Melbourne and Brisbane remote nodes.

We’d also like to thank the very active Queensland BarCamp community, who are coordinating the Brisbane event. Information about the remote events will be added her as soon as it is finalised, and people can RSVP as both physical and virtual attendees below to be kept up to date.

Public Sphere Camp Outline

This schedule is divided into:

  1. Introduction to the day
  2. Mobile and Web 2.0 – including talks, discussion and policy development
  3. Creative Industries – including talks, discussion and policy development
  4. Infrastructure – including talks, discussion and policy development
  5. Location specific discussions along with presentations from each location
  6. Wrapup and thanks

The schedule will consist of self-selected speakers who proposed talks on the blog, as well as some special guests we invited to share their thoughts. It will be a very busy schedule (as is every Public Sphere!) and so talk proposals are open until the 15th August.

Please remember everyone can contribute to this topic on the blog comments below, or on the day via Twitter, comments on the liveblogging or directly into the policy documents on the day.

Public Sphere Camp event details

  • Topic: Australian ICT and Creative Industries Development
  • Date: Friday 28th August 2009
  • Schedule: Will be linked below by the 20th August. To follow basic schedule outline above. Involves short 10 minute talks with simultaneous online discussion and questions along with structured discussion and policy development.
  • Time: 8.30am for a 9am start till 5pm.
  • Social Media: Twitter: #publicsphere or blog: publicsphere or ”Public Sphere”. Post questions on the day to #publicsphere prepended with “QUESTION: “. Liveblogging will also be happening where non-Twitters can post comments into the liveblog interface. We will also be using Google Docs for the facilitated discussion. More information will be linked closer to the day.
  • Video/audio stream for the day: Details to be announced closer to the event.
  • RSVP: RSVP to reserve a spot as either a physical or virtual attendee, and to be kept up to date with event information. Further details on Brisbane and Melbourne events to follow.

Physical event information

  • Wollongong
  • Brisbane
    • Place: Level 5, Axon Building,  Staff House Road, University of Queensland, St. Lucia QLD  Australia 4072. Google map here.
    • Coffee and refreshments: Will be available to attendees with thanks to NICTA.
    • Parking or Transport: Available at venue.
    • Internet: Will of course be available
  • Melbourne
    • Place: This venue was changed to the Gourlay Room (previously the Woodheap Room), Trinity College main campus, Melbourne. Map here.
    • Coffee and refreshments: Will be available to attendees with many thanks to NICTA.
    • Parking or Transport: Details on the Trinity website.
    • Internet: Will of course be available

We may also include another remote node, and will update this page accordingly.

Schedule

Please note, whilst many of these talks will be done at Wollongong, several are prerecorded, or done from Brisbane and Melbourne. All talks will be streamed for outside viewing from a single location to be linked to this site on the day.

All slides available on Slideshare.

Welcome and introduction of process
900 Welcome to UoW and theInnovation Centre Pro Vice-Chancellor of UoW – Joe Chicharo
Video, Transcript
905 Introduction to Public Sphere and process Senator Kate Lundy
Video, Transcript
910 Address from Sharon Bird MP Sharon Bird MP
Video, Transcript
915 Address from Minister Carr, Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science & Research Minister Kim Carr (recorded)
Video, Transcript
920 Industry growth – what we need: The Silicon Beach paper Elias Bizannes, Silicon Beach (recorded)
Video
http://www.siliconbeachaustralia.org/lifeguard/index.html
925 Global context Christopher Hire (Melbourne)
Slides
Information at www.2thinknow.com and analysis at www.innovation-cities.com
Funding & startups
935 Small Pieces, Loosely Funded James Dellow, Headshift
Video, Transcript
There are already plenty of examples around Australia of grass roots entrepreneurial groups (e.g. Silicon Beach) and other self-organising events (e.g. BarCamp) where self-starters in the industry have shown they are more than prepared to invest their own time and effort into creating a local Web 2.0 industry. Considering the value these already contribute to innovation in this country, imagine what we could achieve if the nation actually provided more active support? However, how do we balance the essence of Web 2.0 itself in these grass initiatives vs the overhead of government support?
945 ICT innovation is easy – commercialisation is hard Silvia Pfeiffer, VQuence
Silvia’s blog
Video, Transcript
We have nothing to hide when it comes to ICT innovation. We have a good education system in Australia that creates many creative minds and many innovators. The problems that we have are what has traditionally been described as “crossing the chasm”: taking a new technology from idea/demonstrator and turning it into a business. Having created a startup in Australia in the ICT space, I believe there are some valuable lessons that I can share. Also, I am keen to start a discussion about things we can do to improve the chances of success here in Australia rather than overseas.
955 Using Lean approaches to strengthen the IT industry Henry Vila (recorded)
Video
Background reading
The manufacturing industry has been able to use the principles of Lean and Just in time to create a sustainable competitive advantage for many years.There is an opportunity of the IT industry to grasp the principles mastered by companies like Toyota to deliver increased value and flexibility. By adopting a Lean mentality, the Australian businesses would be able to differentiate themselves from competitors and create a sustainable advantage, increasing efficiency and better serving our clients.Henry will also cover the application to policy.
1000 Discussion – specific opportunities, challenges and support needed
1030 Morning tea
Finding and developing talent
1040 Developing skills for the ICT industry Professor Amanda Lawson, UoW
BiographyVideo, Transcript
The Faculty of Creative Arts at the University of Wollongong is engaging with the development of the Wollongong media practice community at a whole range of levels. We are introducing an innovative new degree in Digital Media, in partnership with the Illawarra Institute of TAFE, which will be based at iC and is geared towards industry fields such as gaming, animation and media production. There are opportunities for exploring digital interactions with traditional visual and performing arts, creative writing, informatics, graphic design and business studies. This talk will also discuss the broader need for relevant skills for industry growth.
1050 Making the Australian ICT landscape attractive for research, innovation and sustainable business. Terry Caelli, NICTA (Brisbane)
Video
1100 Hiive Geoff McQueen
Video, Transcript
Geoff will speak on the talent aspects of the Silicon Beach Lifeguard paper, and will talk about the skills needed to support the industry.
1110 Discussion – specific opportunities, challenges and support needed
Government procurement
1140 The challenges of government procurement for SMBs, and what can be done about it. Loretta Johnson, AIIA
Video, Transcript
1150 Cultural cringe an its impact on Government Procurement James Purser, Collaborynth
Video, Transcript
One of the biggest problems Australia has is the Innovation Cringe. We like to think that we are the “Clever Country” and yet we constantly hear of innovations that have to move over seas because of a lack of support, whether it’s from the private sector or Government. We need to overcome the Cringe if we are going to truly allow our tech and creative industries to grow.
1200 Too smart, too cheap and too small Donna Benjamin, Creative Contingencies (Recorded)
Video
Donna will discuss the challenges of small, innovative companies working with emerging technologies and trying to engage with government.
1210 Discussion – specific opportunities, challenges and support needed
1230 Lunch
Mobile & Web 2.0
1300 Location-based Services for Emergency Management Dr Katina Michael
Her website
Video
The adoption of mobile technologies for emergency management, especially the application of mobile alerts and location-based services during natural disasters, has the capacity to save lives. Increasingly the power of Web 2.0 is being harnessed by citizens for instant messaging in the distribution of content for up to the minute reporting in critical situations. By managing this feedback loop better through intelligent systems, government agencies could better respond to emergencies. This talk would identify the main benefits and risks with such an approach and propose a strategic way forward. Katina will look at both the industry development and the security policy implications, particularly for emergencies situations. Papers http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/125/ http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/124/ http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/14/
1310 Innovation is important but it’s Adoption that counts Rob Manson
Slides
Video
The challenge we really face is the “Diffusion of Innovations” as defined by Rogers and extended in “Crossing the Chasm” by Moore. Over the last 15 years I’ve seen a lot of ICT entrepreneurs pour their heart and soul into creating innovative new technology…yet very few of them had the skills to drive adoption…and all of those paid a high price for that.
This presentation will look at how Web 2.0 and Mobile technologies are changing the “Diffusion of Innovations” and how government/public policy can take advantage of this to deliver real and tangible benefits for our local ICT & Creative industries.
1320 Discussion – specific opportunities, challenges and support needed
Infrastructure
1350 Policy ideas relating to the ICT infrastructure sector John Ferlito, VQuence
Video
John will discuss challenges and policy ideas concerning the broader infrastructure sector including hosting, servers, networks and enterprise architecture.
1400 Green IT Note: Graeme Philipson was originally scheduled for this slot, however on the day he was sick. Green IT is a hot topic, but to many people it is all about reducing the carbon footprint of the IT function within the organization. That is important, but Green IT is about much more than that. IT has a significant role to play in helping reduce the carbon footprint of “the other 98%” that is not caused by IT – through more efficient supply chains, teleworking, improved business processes, etc. IT is also central to measuring and managing carbon emissions.
1410 Discussion – specific opportunities, challenges and support needed
1430 Afternoon tea
Creative Industries
1440 Creative industries – setting the scene Judith Bennett, Creative Industries Innovation Centre (Recorded)
Video
A short talk setting the scene of the Creative industries in Australia, currently support available and future strategies.
1445 Crossing Borders Des Walsh (Recorded)
Video
This event is about ICT *and Creative Industries* but with due respect to the academics and the museum and library people, where are the industry practictioners from those significant sectors of the creative industries, the performing and visual arts? (Or am I not looking at the right list?). I’d like to see a series of regional and national “crossing borders” summits (ok, choose your “gathering” word), supported by government, run as unconferences (could be a bit dicey on the grant acquittal process, that one) and with a real blend of performing and visual artists of distinction together with our leading developers and ICT entrepreneurs, sharing, arguing, disagreeing, re-examining – in short, crossing borders of creativity to produce or stimulate who knows what.
1450 What IS a cultural asset? A/Prof. Chris Gibson.
Talk http://culturemap.org.au/

Please note: Chris was also sick on the day and unable to attend and give this speech.

I am part of a team of researchers based at the University of Wollongong interested in how creative industries emerge within cities and regions; how best to support them; and how they can meet economic and social goals.
Previous research consistently shows that imported models, assumed wisdom and ‘off-the-shelf’ plans don’t work, because creative industries are unusual, driven by cultural trends and populated by producers and consumers through social networks (rather than industry organisations). We need to understand what cultural assets exist in a place already – whatever they might be – and how they can better mesh with creative industries policy development? Our research project seeks answers to these questions.
1500 Online Culture IS the Culture Tim Parsons
Slides
Video
This presentation will build a bridge between the generations by positing the notion that ‘Online Culture is now The Culture’, (watch anyone in the modern workplace for more than 30 minutes in their daily routine and marvel at the plethora of network-enabled behaviours), and suggests a range of implications for the current level of attention or investment in local creative and ICT industries.
1510 Social Media and Creator Cultures: The Virtual Museum as a Digital Ecosystem Peter Eklund
Demonstration video
Video (talk)
The Virtual Museum of the Pacific (VMP) is a social media research project that tests a digital ecosystem to access museum-based collections whose artifacts are physically distributed and often not on public display. The project leverages social tagging for knowledge creation and studies the effective means of presenting and interacting with this network for traditional owners, the general public, researchers and curators.
1520 Discussion – specific opportunities, challenges and support needed
General discussion
1540 Freestyle discussion – any other policy ideas, perhaps specific to locality, or topics not covered during the day.
1610 Group presentation from Brisbane – Audio
1625 Group presentation from Melbourne
1640 Group presentation from Wollongong – video
1655 Close

We look forward to your participation in this very important topic, in person or online. And thank you for your support in developing this mechanism for public engagement in the political process.

Sponsors

The sponsors for this Public Sphere are:

Final thanks

Many thanks to all those who have already contributed, and specially to the volunteers who are helping to make the event happen. In particular our thanks to:

Upcoming related events

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    50 Comments to "Public Sphere #3: Australian ICT & Creative Industries Development" add comment
    James Dellow
    July 29, 2009 at 9:42 pm

    Topic: Small Pieces, Loosely Funded
    Industry Segment: Mobile and Web 2.0
    There are already plenty of examples around Australia of grass roots entrepreneurial groups (e.g. Silicon Beach) and other self-organising events (e.g. BarCamp) where self-starters in the industry have shown they are more than prepared to invest their own time and effort into creating a local Web 2.0 industry. Considering the value these already contribute to innovation in this country, imagine what we could achieve if the nation actually provided more active support? However, how do we balance the essence of Web 2.0 itself in these grass initiatives vs the overhead of government support?

    simonfj
    September 8, 2009 at 10:33 am

    James I’m a great believer in things having to be built in small pieces, from the ground up. They always seem to grow from seeds planted by people with more passion than the sense to know something can’t be done, or are willing to see if something can be; like Pia, Kate and a (very) few others I’ve met.

    But timing is everything. Ten years ago the social atmosphere of a Howard gov, and an understanding of ICT technologies’ evolution simply wouldn’t allow the consideration of this publicsphere, much less its planting – as one example of “small pieces, NO funding”.

    Now green shoots are starting to pop up, even in the usually barren ground around Canberra, and are actualy getting some sun. So we should attempt to fertilise them. If you (anyone who attended this event) believe we should thank Kate and Pia, then could you put your opinion where it might COUNT. http://gov2taskforce.ideascale.com/akira/dtd/14278-5361

    Evan Thomas
    July 30, 2009 at 9:27 am

    Topic: We have the resources let’s use them
    Industry Segment: Infrastructure
    There is a shortage of data centres globally. The hype is Virtualisation, Cloud Computing and Green IT is increasingly important. Wollongong has positioned itself for innovation however it needs tangible opportunities that involve the Government, Universities and business. Collaboration and investment from all could produce some synergistic opportunities. We could establish an innovative Data Centre in Wollongong that is available to the business. Involvement from leading technology companies would be sought and combined with involvement from all parties we could create new opportunities. Specifically this could create job opportunities, provide the environment for the advancement of technologies across a diverse business sector.

    Evan Thomas
    July 30, 2009 at 10:01 am

    Topic: eHealth
    Industry Segment: Infrastructure
    What will it take for Australia to progress eHealth? The National eHealth Transition Authority (NEHTA)has developed a National EHealth Strategy. The national Health and Reforms Commission has released a final report June 2009 “A Healthier Future For All Australians”. The report acknowledges the increased frustration and mounting cynicism with the pace of action on implementing a national eHealth Platform.

    James Purser
    July 30, 2009 at 2:23 pm

    Topic: We Need To Stop Cringing
    Industry Segment: Creative Industries

    One of the biggest problems Australia has is the Innovation Cringe. We like to think that we are the “Clever Country” and yet we constantly hear of innovations that have to move over seas because of a lack of support, whether it’s from the private sector or Government.

    We need to overcome the Cringe if we are going to truly allow our tech and creative industries to grow.

    Andrew Devenish-Meares
    July 30, 2009 at 3:31 pm

    Topic: The technology of Community Broadcasting
    Industry Segment: Creative Industries

    Australia is fortunate to have a large, unique independent community broadcasting sector, with over 300 stations around the country.

    With stations operated by more than 30 000 volunteers from all walks of life, from all areas of the country, representing all kinds of communities, what are the opportunities and challenges presented by the evolving ICT sector, and how does that effect what you see and hear?

    Steve Dalton
    July 30, 2009 at 4:21 pm

    We are organising a remote node in Brisbane. Would be good if someone could add our event page to the main #publicsphere 3 page too please. It’s http://www.meetup.com/barcampqld/calendar/10947834

    Rob Manson
    July 30, 2009 at 4:35 pm

    Topic: Innovation is important but it’s Adoption that counts
    Industry Segment: Mobile & Web 2.0

    Australia doesn’t have any shortage of Innovations. We have been at the forefront of ICT development since the days of Multimedia CD-Roms. Some great Web 2.0 innovations have been developed locally and personally I’ve been focused on creating innovative Mobile services for at least the last 5 years.

    The challenge we really face is the “Diffusion of Innovations” as defined by Rogers and extended in “Crossing the Chasm” by Moore. Over the last 15 years I’ve seen a lot of ICT entrepreneurs pour their heart and soul into creating innovative new technology…yet very few of them had the skills to drive adoption…and all of those paid a high price for that.

    This presentation will look at how Web 2.0 and Mobile technologies are changing the “Diffusion of Innovations” and how government/public policy can take advantage of this to deliver real and tangible benefits for our local ICT & Creative industries.

    NOTE: Personally I find it difficult to separate them into 2 industries nowadays.

    Tim Parsons
    July 30, 2009 at 11:01 pm

    Topic : Online Culture IS the Culture

    A throwaway line by Kevin Kelly of Wired Magazine fame.

    According to snippets from Wikipedia.org, a “culture” is

    “an integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for symbolic thought and social learning”

    and/or

    “the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution, organization or group.”

    Examples :-
    - Car Culture = 20% + of urban landscapes are devoted to automobiles and trucks (roads + parking)
    - Consumer Culture = mass media, FMCGs, manufacturing, oil-based energy economy

    These two alone have utterly transformed the worlds we humans live in.

    This presentation will build a bridge between the generations by positing the notion that ‘Online Culture is now The Culture’, (watch anyone in the modern workplace for more than 30 minutes in their daily routine and marvel at the plethora of network-enabled behaviours), and suggests a range of implications for the current level of attention or investment in local creative and ICT industries.

    (Thanks to Rob Manson @nambor for the tweet pointing me here!)

    simonfj
    August 29, 2009 at 10:15 am

    Tim,
    When i read this abstract, I thought your preso was going to be pretty boring. But if I was giving stars for the day (and they had any worth) yours gets my high five.

    I just wish there was a way of explaining to people who have never experienced a culture what a different one is like. E.g. asking for a macchiato in Memphis gets a very different response than asking for one in Milan; one could never explain to the engineers who work in http://www.arcs.org.au/forums the culture we found ourselves immersed in yesterday.

    But at least, online, we can point to remote communities, if not their differences (in attitude and knowledge)and see, by communicating, where the commonality in their differences coincide.

    I’d really like to see how your message – Online Culture IS the culture – could be adapted as its meaningless for those with no experience of IT. The lecture approach makes you (and me) appear as a preacher from a peculiar country; one where an experiment is NOT something from which ‘unprofessional’ parties must always be excluded. i.e. locked in a lab (silo) until it is completed, after which its incomplete findings (policy) are disseminated to apathetic communities, as is the norm in Australia. http://www.acid.net.au/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=44&Itemid=126

    Its pretty hard to explain a collaborative culture to one in which ‘publish and be damned’ is the measure of value. I guess that’s why some writers use ‘perpetual beta’ as a principle.

    Tim Parsons
    August 31, 2009 at 9:51 am

    Thank you for the kudos Simon.

    It was exactly that feeling – appearing as a preacher from a peculiar country – that i’ve been struggling with throughout my careers, first as a scientist/engineer, and then as an online applications developer, and now a brand and strategy consultant.

    I’m thinking it comes with the territory when you’re a ‘working futurist’ – but it’s also important in a country like Australia to call ‘time’ when outdated modes of thought are starting to hold us back – and I think the evidence, quarterly results and school report cards are in : we’re living in a networked age and those of us about to enter boardrooms and cabinet rooms had better start understand the new rules, fast.

    Cheers and hope we can sit down and have a yarn about this stuff one day in person :-)

    A/Prof. Chris Gibson
    July 31, 2009 at 1:42 pm

    Topic: What IS a cultural asset?
    Industry segment: Creative industries

    I am part of a team of researchers based at the University of Wollongong interested in how creative industries emerge within cities and regions; how best to support them; and how they can meet economic and social goals.

    We are embarking on a major, $2.5 million, 5-year federal government funded project to ask questions about what the ‘cultural assets’ for creative industries development might be in regions like Wollongong, Albury and Armidale – outside capital cities. It’s called the CAMRA project (Cultural Asset Mapping for Regional Australia). http://culturemap.org.au/

    Previous research consistently shows that imported models, assumed wisdom and ‘off-the-shelf’ plans don’t work, because creative industries are unusual, driven by cultural trends and populated by producers and consumers through social networks (rather than industry organisations). We need to understand what cultural assets exist in a place already – whatever they might be – and how they can better mesh with creative industries policy development? Our research project seeks answers to these questions.

    Katina Michael
    August 1, 2009 at 11:42 pm

    Dr Katina Michael

    Senior Lecturer @ UOW
    School of Information Systems and Technology
    Faculty of Informatics

    Topic: Location-based Services for Emergency Management
    Industry Segment: Mobile/Web 2.0

    The adoption of mobile technologies for emergency management, especially the application of mobile alerts and location-based services during natural disasters, has the capacity to save lives. Increasingly the power of Web 2.0 is being harnessed by citizens for instant messaging in the distribution of content for up to the minute reporting in critical situations. By managing this feedback loop better through intelligent systems, government agencies could better respond to emergencies. This talk would identify the main benefits and risks with such an approach and propose a strategic way forward.

    Papers
    http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/125/
    http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/124/
    http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/14/

    Matthew Hodgson
    August 3, 2009 at 4:16 pm

    Topic: Organisational readiness
    Industry segment: Creative industries

    With a little innovation and creative thinking we can come up with some great ways of assessing Government 2.0 needs, cultural and organisational readiness, functionality to support government programs and projects … you just need to know the right theory to apply, a spark of genius, and some creative talent.

    I’ve just created and used a Web 2.0 card set that, in a workshop environment, asks individuals to select the items that best suit their projects. What I discovered when I first used these was quite interesting — particularly with relation to individual choice versus cultural norms. The results point to organisational readiness.

    The card set I used can be downloaded from: http://magia3e.wordpress.com/2009/07/24/web-2-0-workshop-card-game/ and my high-level findings can be read at: http://magia3e.wordpress.com/2009/07/29/results-from-web-2-0-workshop-card-game/

    I would love to talk about my experience in using these cards at the next Public Sphere.

    M

    simonfj
    August 4, 2009 at 11:35 pm

    I’ll just put this link in here, as it might stimulate a few ideas.
    This is a theme from an interesting conference run, earlier this year, by the guys at MIT. It relates creativity to infrastructure. http://wiki.ocwconsortium.org/index.php?title=A_Call_for_Papers:_OCWC_Global_2009_-_Content%2C_Infrastructure%2C_and_Creativity

    A little background. MIT give most of their courseware away. OCWC is a consortia of unis around the world who have found it creates value in their approach to education. MIT are also responsible for akamai, which powers about 20% of the web. This might help you visualize the network. http://www.akamai.com/html/technology/dataviz3.html

    I thought this might be useful as a comparison against the “cultural mapping” approach, which aims to “integrate the effective development of the arts and cultural industries”. In some countries they, art and culture, just aren’t considered industries. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/culture

    They’re just a way of life. Of course they have a very different form of education. It tends to emphasize creativity, not economics. Comments?

    Henry Vila
    August 7, 2009 at 10:20 am

    Topic: Using Lean approaches to strengthen the IT industry

    The manufacturing industry has been able to use the principles of Lean and Just in time to create a sustainable competitive advantage for many years.

    There is an opportunity of the IT industry to grasp the principles mastered by companies like Toyota to deliver increased value and flexibility. By adopting a Lean mentality, the Australian businesses would be able to differentiate themselves from competitors and create a sustainable advantage, increasing efficiency and better serving our clients.

    I have experienced this principles first hand in my IT Strategy work at Toyota. I have also been able to explore these principles in an academic environment. I would love the opportunity to share these knowledge with the broader community.

    Peter Eklund
    August 7, 2009 at 1:26 pm

    Topic: Social Media and Creator Cultures: The Virtual Museum as a Digital Ecosystem
    Industry Segment: Web 2.0 and Creative industries
    The Virtual Museum of the Pacific (VMP) is a social media research project that tests a digital ecosystem to access museum-based collections whose artifacts are physically distributed and often not on public display. The project leverages social tagging for knowledge creation and studies the effective means of presenting and interacting with this network for traditional owners, the general public, researchers and curators.

    Peter Eklund
    August 31, 2009 at 10:39 am

    Several folks asked for it, the URL for the Virtual Museum of the Pacific (VMP) is available on request.

    This is under the assumption that you are trying it out as a beta test technology demonstrator and that you might (if you have comments) give some feedback to peklund@uow.edu.au.

    Otherwise the VMP not released for general public consumption until such time as the “creator communities” have been properly consulted, probably October 2009.

    /Peter

    simonfj
    August 31, 2009 at 11:23 am

    Hi Peter,

    It’s a pity people can’t see all the hard work you’ve done, cause it looked really good. We seem to be in a continuum – from keeping the goodies hidden, to ‘putting them all out there’ so a global sociable set can ‘use’ them. I’ll point to at the Glamwiki conference. Rose’s and Kent’s preso about the nla’s newspapers digitization is on the tchnology thread. http://wikimedia.org.au/wiki/GLAM

    You can see the user login on this page and hall of fame for the correcters down the bottom here. http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/home , Rose said she has about 5,000 of them who have sprung up (30% are OS). Compensating for the OCR mistakes.

    We still have this problem where no one seems to be taking the lead on bring a bunch of conversations together, (using something like a whirlpool forum) so we can get some coordinated collaboration happening between the GLAM et al. So until the culture changes, & we get past the Aussie reticence, these two blogs seem to track most progressive discussion.
    http://nlablog.wordpress.com/2009/08/10/feeling-glum-after-glam-wiki/
    http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/dmsblog/index.php/2009/08/09/some-thoughts-post-glam-wiki-2009/
    All the best.

    Pia Waugh
    August 31, 2009 at 11:32 am

    I’ve posted a link to the demonstration video (screencast) on the schedule that Peter presented on the day which will at least who people how it worked. Nice :)

    Professor Amanda Lawson
    August 14, 2009 at 3:03 pm

    Dean, Faculty of Creative Arts
    University of Wollongong

    Industry Segment: Creative Industries
    Topic: Digital Futures @UOW: Training, research and development

    The Faculty of Creative Arts at the University of Wollongong is engaging with the development of the Wollongong media practice community at a whole range of levels. We are introducing an innovative new degree in Digital Media, in partnership with the Illawarra Institute of TAFE, which will be based at iC and is geared towards industry fields such as gaming, animation and media production. We also offer Journalism training which places a priority on convergent news while recognising the ongoing importance of traditional media. Contemporary digital practices with an arts orientation are available within the Bachelor of Creative Arts, through our Media Arts, Sound and Creative Writing programs. There are opportunities for exploring digital interactions with traditional visual and performing arts, creative writing, informatics, graphic design and business studies. Several of our staff are leaders in digital media practices, contemporary photomedia, sound and sound technologies, reflected in innovative research and creative projects as well as developmental partnerships in the cultural industries at local and national levels.

    Pia Waugh
    August 14, 2009 at 4:58 pm

    Brisbane and Melbourne venues added to the blog post. Also, the schedule will be drafted early next week, so get your talks in! :)

    Pia Waugh
    August 18, 2009 at 5:10 pm

    Christopher Hire (who is helping on the ground in the Melbourne event) has offered to do a short global context talk to help set the scene. Just noting here for people’s information.

    Silvia Pfeiffer
    August 20, 2009 at 8:55 am

    Topic: ICT innovation is easy – commercialisation is hard
    Industry Segment: Web 2.0

    We have nothing to hide when it comes to ICT innovation. We have a good education system in Australia that creates many creative minds and many innovators. The problems that we have are what has traditionally been described as “crossing the chasm”: taking a new technology from idea/demonstrator and turning it into a business.

    The reasons that so many startups (and also research organisations like CSIRO and NICTA) grapple with this problem are manyfold and I will not go into details here, but only make a quick list:
    * size of the Australian market
    * invented-here-syndrome
    * risk-aversity in investors and customers
    * lack of appreciation of investment needs in ICT
    * competitive thinking rather than collaborative thinking
    * lack of access to large ICT organisations and their research

    Many of these cannot be overcome easily – Australia is inherently a small market, and large ICT organisations like Apple, Google, Akamai, etc do not have large research here. But many things can be done that aren’t: such as providing a precinct where startups can find all they need in infrastructure, connectivity, mentoring, exposure, and a pub and cafe where they will easily bump into others that are working in similar areas and could be very helpful to partner with.

    Having tried to create a startup in Australia in the ICT space, I believe there are some valuable lessons that I can share. Also, I am keen to start a discussion about things we can do to improve the chances of success here in Australia rather than overseas.

    simonfj
    August 27, 2009 at 6:51 am

    Silvia,

    Could you also mention ‘social atmosphere’ and ‘timing’ in your talk. Not sure what your start up was. If your talk is about the Annodex stuff, you should note that you might have been too early. True, you’ll never get it going in Australia as the bandwidth (and its cost) outside the .edu and .gov institutions prohibits building an Aussie Annodex community. But, to put it in context; most global Institutionalists have mistaken the web for a publishing platform and not a collaborative one, so that baby of yours will never give birth until they get over the misconception, and understand what ‘on net’ means (to costs, etc).

    I was going to point you at this doc, while you were talking video over on the gov2 ‘hack amd mash’ thread, cause it’s a measure of the change in paradigm. Video, in the collaborative space, is about ‘capture’ not ‘publish’. Seems we’re about (say) one third of the way through the shift at present. Once the .edu’s get in ‘capture’ mode, creatives will be thinking about mashups, and annodex MIGHT come into its own. https://depot.northwestern.edu/bnielsen/Lecture%20Capture%20in%20Higher%20Education.pdf?ticket=t_ztikXGmJ

    No need to explain the reasons for the shift. ‘The Bill’ (TV show) is good example of how institutions could use unobtusive video cameras, and their recordings, and what for. Why they don’t? NIH syndrome is on your list.

    So if your talk on Friday is about Annodex, could you put it into the context of ..” THE FIRST TIME I tried to start tried to create a startup in Australia”. Wouldn’t want to give the wrong impression, no?

    Silvia Pfeiffer
    August 27, 2009 at 11:53 am

    My talk was not going to be about Annodex at all. My talk is about the opportunities and the support that Australian entrepreneurs receive in building a business. My background for this is from Vquence and from what I hear through other innovators and entrepreneurs.

    Also, just to point this out: the Annodex technology was built to become a standard and thus encourage products to be built around it – it wasn’t built to be a company itself. CSIRO shut down the project just before it became market relevant. Annodex innovations have been assimilated into Xiph technology, into W3C standards, and into open source software such as Firefox. There are a sizeable number of US companies making use of Annodex type technology, but none in Australia.

    Australia will pick up on the technology when it has been validated overseas, as part of the HTML5 video tag and Media Fragment URIs. We have a big “invented here” problem, where we reject any new technology coming out of Australia while it has not been validated overseas. That’s a big mistake for Australian innovation – we can never be the first to make money of our inventions.

    However – this is a thread for another discussion and only a minor issue on the landscape of thing my talk will be about.

    simonfj
    September 4, 2009 at 9:42 am

    Silvia,

    Well thanks for the update to Annodex anyway. It was really so far reaching for what I would normally discover in Oz, which is which I came up to meet yu all that time ago.

    You’ve illustrated one of the points which is SO important.
    Timing = “CSIRO shut down the project just before it became market relevant”. It’s one of the most common complaints in most of the Aussie stuff I’ve tracked (and helped with a little) over the past 30 years. Perspiration beats inspiration every time.

    The three other main problems – the lack of capital formation, lack of a innovative social atmosphere (culture), and lack of understanding in the change of demographics – are just things which probably never hit the radar in Australia because the term ‘Innovation’ is so abused in this country.

    So excuse me while I say this again. But for any technologist who takes pride in their baby, it always seems to be ignored. Innovation is a economic or social term. It is NOT a technical term. This is not me talking. It’s Peter Drucker in a book called Innovation & Entreprenuership, which is the only treatment of Innovation which I could call credible, especially after reading those books Rob mentioned. Excuse this grumpy old man.

    Silvia
    September 4, 2009 at 11:06 am

    Market innovation is often based on technical innovation first in the modern Internet age. If we have a culture of ignoring technical innovation in Australia, we will always stay behind.

    Pia Waugh
    August 25, 2009 at 11:25 am

    Note for briefing paper:

    The Silicon Beach group have released a policy ideas discussion paper for this Public Sphere.

    http://www.siliconbeachaustralia.org/lifeguard/

    Great preparation reading material for the day and for broader Public Sphere discussions. Well done to the Silicon Beach group, and in particular to Elias Bizannes.

    Jude Bennett
    August 25, 2009 at 11:29 am

    Business Advisor, Vicotira
    Creative Industries Innovation Centre
    http://www.enterprise connect.gov.au.
    http://www.enterpriseconnect.gov.au/INNOVATION/Pages/CreativeIndustriesInnovationCentre.aspx

    Industry Segment: Creative Industries
    Topic: Federal government no cost advice services

    I have just begun as the Business Advisor in Victoria for the Creative Industries Innovation Centre. And yes, there are BAs covering all States – all with lots of experience working with creative companies.

    Through undertaking a no cost business review, we work with creative SMES (and that includes digital art & media, games, film companies) who have turnover of $1 million plus, to undertand your business strategy and operations and to identify strengths and weaknesses – and opportunities to improve eg how to grow, be more productive, competitive and innovative, or be more creative.

    If the review recommends you would benefit from expert help, the government offers matched funding up to $20,000 for you to obtain that.

    Happy to talk more one-on-one or generally about how you can apply, our experiences and our clients.

    Glenn Irvine
    August 25, 2009 at 12:12 pm

    Can I suggest the use of an IdeaJam (http://bit.ly/gBpD1) for collating ideas from these types of sessions and to open to a broader audience, as well as to allow the promotion of ideas by all participants.

    I participated in a Global IdeaJam run last week over a 72 hour period which involved over 900 people, raising more than a thousand ideas with 20,000 votes to promote or demote ideas and providing an amazing clarity of clear priorities within the first 48 hours alone.

    A very worthwhile process.

    I can advise on how these are used, as well as connect to local (Australian) providers of these solutions and consulting if interested…

    Pia Waugh
    August 26, 2009 at 8:10 am

    Hi Glenn, it looks interesting. I don’t want to change horses at this late stage for this Public Sphere, but please email your contact details at pia.waugh at aph.gov.au and we’ll chat. We want the Public Sphere to be as open as possible to contribute, so a 72 hour fully online tool could be _part_ of the process, but it would exclude several categories of people from contributing. We like having the topic open for weeks ahead of an event, then weeks after the event, and then the compilation into a publicly collaborated briefing paper. The recommendations are then voted on, but after a thoughtful and interactive process where even people not comfortable with online tools can email us, or send us a letter (although everything receiv0. ed on the topic is published in the spirit of transparency and accountability. We also want to tap into existing communities rather than trying to pull everyone into a single tool, which means more inputs. Makes aggregating harder, but is worthwhile we feel. Anyway, we are always looking for more useful tools to experiment with.

    I’ve replied publicly in case others have ideas to suggest for future Public Spheres.

    simonfj
    August 29, 2009 at 11:53 am

    That’s the idea Glenn. We’re going down this path, although it’s going to be a bit impossible unless we put together an Aussie version of IdeaJam. Pia’s strapped together a few US tools and spent what Ideajam would have paid for lunch. But that’s only because she’s brilliant.

    Pia, It’s probably an good idea at this time (post sphere3) to give some consideration to where we are aiming to go. I’ll just leave these docs, so we don’t forget them.
    http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/proc/reports/pciwc/index.htm
    http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/proc/studyprogram/report.htm

    Eventually, if we are going to infect the inhabitants in the House on the Hill, we will need to include these people so they understand a publicsphere culture, about which, Kate can only present reports. http://www.aph.gov.au/DPS/Administration.htm
    Of course, we could always approach this from the OS end.(hand waving violently)

    The thing which is going to turn old heads up there is using the channels put aside for supporting aph committees as the main ‘output’ monitor. (I think they’re around channel 40 by (my lousy) memory.

    Des Walsh
    August 25, 2009 at 12:26 pm

    Industry Sector: Creative Industries
    Topic: Crossing Borders

    Living on a state border I am reminded on a daily basis how we seem to love divisions in the ways this sparsely populated country works, even if it limits our potential for discovery and productivity. And in that vein I understand why we segment “creative industries” from “ICT” but I believe that’s a brake on progress and I’d love to see some national effort to cross the borders and do some potentially distracting, possibly rewarding, mingling and sharing.

    In my experience it’s not an easy call to get the geeks and the arties together, and *working* together, but when you do you can get some fascinating synergies and new ways of looking at things.

    This event is about ICT *and Creative Industries* but with due respect to the academics and the museum and library people, where are the industry practictioners from those significant sectors of the creative industries, the performing and visual arts? (Or am I not looking at the right list?). I’d like to see a series of regional and national “crossing borders” summits (ok, choose your “gathering” word), supported by government, run as unconferences (could be a bit dicey on the grant acquittal process, that one) and with a real blend of performing and visual artists of distinction together with our leading developers and ICT entrepreneurs, sharing, arguing, disagreeing, re-examining – in short, crossing borders of creativity to produce or stimulate who knows what.

    I’ll be in Brisbane on the day, just across the border from my colonially-defined place of residence.

    simonfj
    August 27, 2009 at 5:58 am

    Dear Mr Border Rider,

    You’ve learnt your lessons well by the sounds of it. Now what are those divisions? Geeks and arties eh? Yeah, that sounds about right, as long as we are clear there is no single professional division for “creatives”.

    It’s the ‘professional’ border mentality that drive me to distraction. Once you’re trained for them, the hole is so hard to crawl out of. Education, since we were little boys, seems to have been dumbed down to a “curricula delivery system”; a super efficient one of course, filled largely of overtrained bureaucrats. I heard some of them even believe that by ‘creating’ a policy, they might change people’s behaviour or a nation’s culture. Overtraining is a terrible thing. It makes crossing borders impossible. Woof!

    I think we should play this video at the start of every session and then just ask people when it is they think they were damaged, or the system got out of wack. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iG9CE55wbtY
    It’s always hard to start therapy before you get to the root of the problem.

    I’m with you on the conference series. Could we…. arrgh, go cross a border will ya. I’m sick of trying to compensate for divisions. http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/08/13/hack-mash-and-innovate-contests-coming-soon/#comment-930

    Des Walsh
    August 27, 2009 at 11:39 am

    Brilliant video – thanks for sharing. One of my brothers has never forgotten that at school he painted or “coloured in” a picture of a sailing boat with red sails and was reproved by the teacher who said sails had to be white: as my brother always said, the teacher had obviously never heard the song.

    I do like the idea of getting rid of borders as you say elsewhere. Technology enables this in so many ways. In the meantime, I see us as having an obligation to disrupt the bordered regimes.

    Pia Waugh
    August 26, 2009 at 1:42 pm

    I had a paper emailed to me by Owen Thomas that he wanted to put forward for this Public Sphere.

    “Clique Space(TM) is a system that models user presence and interactions with other users in real-time over any devices a user may be using at a point in time. The concept can additionally control device behaviour. Amongst this systems utility, the inventor presents an example in the paper on the pragmatic possibility to manage and coordinate teams composed of team members who are not collocated.

    Such a system as Clique Space might open the possibility for great social change. It suggests a solution to rural and remote poverty by allowing jobs currently considered available only in metropolitan centres to be taken by non-metropolitan citizens.”

    Paper: http://www.katelundy.com.au/wp-content/uploads/Owen-Thomas-Research-Proposal-Paper-v1.pdf

    Hannah Suarez
    August 27, 2009 at 5:14 pm

    Hey all,
    May not be able to make it at all/be there all day for the Brisbane node tomorrow. Definitely keen to have a write-up about the discussions tomorrow for http://www.briscreativeindustries.com to spread the word about what has been discussed.
    I look forward to following the #publicsphere hashtag with interest!

    Arjen Lentz
    August 28, 2009 at 5:21 pm

    As spinout from a recent Barcamp there’s a new group in Brisbane, Upstarta.biz, incubating bootstrapping businesses and business ideas through co-mentoring and sharing resources.
    Success is, very often, not achieved by tossing more money at an issue. It can even be a hindrance.

    Silvia Pfeiffer
    August 28, 2009 at 8:08 pm

    Thanks for another awesome and impressive event. I look forward to the summary paper. But I also look forward to the description of all the technology that you used. This Public Sphere really pushed the boundaries and I am curious how it all came together in the end.

    Thanks for another awesome event, Senator Lundy, and thanks to all your busy helpers!

    Peta Pash
    August 31, 2009 at 1:51 pm

    MEGA – Growing Australia’s Digital Economy
    This program is an example of successful collaboration across industry, education and government to increase the capability and capacity of an industry.
    MEGA is an industry–led entrepreneurship master-class program which takes participants from the mobile, digital content and ICT industries through an industry-driven development program to build their creative, technical and business skills for the development of new products and services for global markets.

    The MEGA program is open to students, individual practitioners and companies.

    Participants form project teams and, guided by industry experts, develop and pitch new products and services to investors, buyers and business identities at a high profile Pitch Day in each state.

    MEGA introduces participants to a range of high profile industry presenters and mentors. Participants are also supported by a large MEGA support network of industry, education and government.

    The MEGA program is accredited by both the higher education and VET sectors.

    MEGA is a national program which has been held in Adelaide (since 2006), Sydney and Melbourne (since 2008).

    More information is available at http://www.mega.org.au and our professional networking site is at http://meganode.ning.com

    Cheers

    Peta

    simonfj
    September 4, 2009 at 10:35 am

    That was interesting Peta,

    I was a bit surprised though. I thought i would have been able to read through the ning blogs and conversations before registering. Tim and I were taking about ‘online’ culture, and the main thing for me is to include people in a group’s learning, even if the group might know nothing about them (except by the reader/viewership figures). Persuasion is a funny thing.
    http://www.slideshare.net/james.w.ramos/diffusion-of-innovation-ch-112198
    ; sometimes – if you believe people like to learn – a group can be more influential by just having a quiet conversation and let people eavesdrop.

    It also stunned me that none of your facilitators or mentors had a link from their corporate sites back to your common MEGA ning community. Reminds me of all the uni sites = very corporate; pointing everywhere except to where the learning is shared. Not much of an online culture, eh? Still, we’re all in pilot phase aren’t we? http://p2pu.org/About-P2PU

    Peta Pash
    September 4, 2009 at 3:19 pm

    Hi Simon

    We have had a lot of discussion about whether to make meganode public. I must say I’m pretty new to all this but it was suggested that if it was public it would need to be moderated and we didn’t want to have to do that.

    I guess because its not public no-one links to it.

    Anyway you are sort of right – its in pilot phase but I think it will always be in pilot phase and we welcome feedback about how we can make it more useful for the mega community.

    Cheers

    Peta

    Pia Waugh
    August 31, 2009 at 2:07 pm

    Wrapup added to the website with datasets from the day here:

    http://www.katelundy.com.au/2009/08/31/public-sphere-3-wrapup/

    Includes next steps :)

    Pia Waugh
    September 8, 2009 at 3:20 pm

    I think Terry Cutler’s Innovation Review fits nicely into this issue:

    http://www.innovation.gov.au/innovationreview/Pages/home.aspx

    Reference to add to briefing paper.

    Shannon Scott
    October 1, 2009 at 4:58 am

    Hi All, for those involved in Public Sphere, you might be interested in an analysis of the PS3 data performed in the Palantir analysis platform…

    A video of the analysis is on the Palantir Analysis Blog: http://www.palantirtech.com/government/analysis-blog/public_sphere

    This data is accessible for viewing and analysis directly within Palantir at https://www.analysis2.net.au (create an account to get started!)

    Shannon

    Pia Waugh
    October 2, 2009 at 11:10 am

    Paper sent by A/Prof. Chris Gibson who couldn’t present on the day due to being sick.

    http://www.katelundy.com.au/wp-content/uploads/CAMRA-summary.pdf

    Mitch Solinye
    July 19, 2012 at 10:36 pm

    Just dropping a note because I like what’s going on here. Keep it up.

    Simonfj
    August 1, 2012 at 12:35 pm

    Nice to see that this thread is still used as a reference for how things were (getting on) 3 years ago. Kinda makes the point though.

    With all this talk about creativity and trying to get different agendas and disciplines together, we often miss thinking through how the MEDIA record of proceedings might be used in the future. i.e. We spend so much time thinking about these records – http://www.naa.gov.au/records-management/agency/ – that we just don’t consider how agencies might collaborate to keep these ones – http://www.naa.gov.au/records-management/agency/digital/socialmedia/index.aspx

    Looks like we’ve still got some way to go before we understand how principle 2 is supposed to operate, and who is supposed t0 do it. http://www.naa.gov.au/records-management/agency/digital/digital-continuity/principles/index.aspx

    The lastest version of these good intentions about enlarging the public sphere (in the Canberra offices of Federal gov) to pick up the ball seems to to be here. http://innovation.govspace.gov.au/2012/05/03/centre-for-excellence-%E2%80%93-charter-and-governance/ We’ll see how they handle the next version of “the digital continuity”.